Kungfu as a Vehicle for Multimodal Intercultural Communication A Chinese-New Zealand Case Study: Ant Sang’s Shaolin Burning (2011) Preliminary Observations

  • Fang Zheng

Abstract

I would argue that in the Chinese-New Zealand case study I am discussing in this article – Ant Sang’s Shaolin Burning (2011) – Kungfu corresponds to a collection of Martial Arts techniques that are similar to the traditional/old-style Kungfu novels. For Example, Sifu, Deadly Plum Blossom’s (the heroin) Kungfu master, once introduced her understanding of Kungfu in Shaolin Burning (2011): “The most important principle to remember is to protect your centreline. This protects your eyes, neck and all your vital organs... It forces your opponent to attack in a circular path, which is an indirect path, and therefore slower […] Control the centreline and you control the fight. Not only do you use the centreline for defence, use it also for attack. My punch is unorthodox. It is deceptively short and direct, but when performed correctly has devastating power.” (SB 51-54) Those are typical guidelines for Martial Arts techniques.

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Published
2020-11-15
How to Cite
ZHENG, Fang. Kungfu as a Vehicle for Multimodal Intercultural Communication A Chinese-New Zealand Case Study: Ant Sang’s Shaolin Burning (2011) Preliminary Observations. Neke. The New Zealand Journal of Translation Studies, [S.l.], v. 3, n. 1, nov. 2020. ISSN 2538-0761. Available at: <https://ojs.victoria.ac.nz/neke/article/view/6623>. Date accessed: 04 dec. 2020.