The Development of Resource Teachers in New Zealand: A Quarter Century of Paradigm Change

  • Charlotte Thomson
  • Don Brown
  • Elizabeth Jones
  • Elizabeth Manins

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to trace the development of the role of Resource Teachers Learning and Behaviour (RTLB) from its genesis in the establishment of the Guidance and Learning Units in 1975, through the establishment of support teams and Resource Teacher Special Needs to its present form. This development is placed in the context of two paradigm shifts that have impacted on special education practice and policy in New Zealand over the last 25 years. The somewhat halting progress of special education is explained by the multi-paradigmatic nature of the social sciences and the consequent clashes of opinion and tensions that result from it.

National guidelines have made schools responsible for the learning of all children. These guidelines addressed issues of equity, rights, values and devolved accountability and consequently included those students with special teaching needs who had previously been considered separately. These guidelines therefore enabled changes in special education to take place. The paper goes on to outline the rationale and structure of the training programme for RTLB and discusses some of the tensions still remaining in the implementation of the role.

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Author Biographies

Charlotte Thomson
Don Brown
Elizabeth Jones
Elizabeth Manins
Published
1999-02-08
How to Cite
THOMSON, Charlotte et al. The Development of Resource Teachers in New Zealand: A Quarter Century of Paradigm Change. The New Zealand Annual Review of Education, [S.l.], n. 9, feb. 1999. ISSN 1178-3311. Available at: <https://ojs.victoria.ac.nz/nzaroe/article/view/1378>. Date accessed: 28 oct. 2020. doi: https://doi.org/10.26686/nzaroe.v0i9.1378.

Keywords

Special Education