Reflections on the Budget 2015 Child Hardship Package

  • Susan St John

Abstract

The 2015 Budget contained benefit rate increases for beneficiaries with children and some minor adjustments  to work-based child-related tax credits. The significance of these increases when other policies are taken into account suggests a reshuffling of money in which much of the distributional effect will be minimal and offset. For children it resembles the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff rather than a structural review of child-related income policies that might be reformist, preventative and inclusive. The cost to society is more complexity in the benefit system and a cementing in of reliance on work-related child tax credits that have unproven worth either in incentivising work or in reducing child poverty. A rational policy-making approach with the clear aim of child poverty reduction, measurable outcomes, agreed criteria and a process for evaluation might have suggested that a different policy direction was more appropriate and more likely to be effective.

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Published
2015-08-01
How to Cite
ST JOHN, Susan. Reflections on the Budget 2015 Child Hardship Package. Policy Quarterly, [S.l.], v. 11, n. 3, aug. 2015. ISSN 2324-1101. Available at: <https://ojs.victoria.ac.nz/pq/article/view/4543>. Date accessed: 25 oct. 2020. doi: https://doi.org/10.26686/pq.v11i3.4543.