The role of the State in Early Childhood Care and Education: Kindergartens as a Case Study of Changing Relationships

  • Claire Davison
  • Linda Mitchell

Abstract

Much of the public discussion of early childhood education policies has focused on particular policy initiatives, rather than considering more broadly what should be the role of the state in relation to young children’s education and upbringing. The roles that the state chooses to play are political decisions that are influenced by constructions of childhood and preferred policy approaches. In turn, these policy approaches help shape the nature of early childhood education. This article analyses changing models of state responsibility for New Zealand kindergartens to highlight their repercussions on kindergartens and the wider early childhood education sector. It argues that the state needs to take a supportive and responsible role in provision of early childhood care and education, to support a move away from a market model, and to resolve inequities in children’s access and teacher employment conditions that continue to beset the sector. The article ends by setting the discussion within an international context and suggesting policy challenges for early childhood education in New Zealand.

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Author Biographies

Claire Davison
Linda Mitchell
Published
2008-07-01
How to Cite
DAVISON, Claire; MITCHELL, Linda. The role of the State in Early Childhood Care and Education: Kindergartens as a Case Study of Changing Relationships. The New Zealand Annual Review of Education, [S.l.], n. 18, july 2008. ISSN 1178-3311. Available at: <https://ojs.victoria.ac.nz/nzaroe/article/view/1550>. Date accessed: 28 oct. 2020. doi: https://doi.org/10.26686/nzaroe.v0i18.1550.

Keywords

Early Childhood Education