The NCEA in the Context of the Knowledge Society and National Policy Expectations

  • Rosemary Hipkins

Abstract

The introduction of the National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEA), as the key school-based components of New Zealand’s National Qualifications Framework (NQF) has been accompanied by controversy around a range of issues. It seems that much of the debate has centred on surface level symptoms, and has not probed the deep underlying causes of the tensions. In this article I locate the assessment changes of the NQF/NCEA within the “knowledge society” imperative for “life-long learning” and explore consequences of the expectation that assessment can serve this overarching goal at the same time as the results are used for accountability purposes – that, is for “raising standards”. The tensions created by these conflicting expectations must be confronted openly before they can be resolved.

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Author Biography

Rosemary Hipkins
Published
2004-07-01
How to Cite
HIPKINS, Rosemary. The NCEA in the Context of the Knowledge Society and National Policy Expectations. The New Zealand Annual Review of Education, [S.l.], n. 14, july 2004. ISSN 1178-3311. Available at: <https://ojs.victoria.ac.nz/nzaroe/article/view/1486>. Date accessed: 28 oct. 2020. doi: https://doi.org/10.26686/nzaroe.v0i14.1486.

Keywords

Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability