"A definite feeling of antagonism": Rising Tensions over Clothing at the Featherston Prisoner-of-War Camp in World War Two

  • Kristyn Harman

Abstract

This article utilises negotiations around the clothing issued to Japanese prisoners of war during World War Two as a lens through which to view aspects of the social history of the Featherston Camp. A particular focus is the prisoners’ objections to the requirement that they wear distinguishing khaki patches. Such objections went beyond being merely verbal, translating into physical interventions to modify their uniforms. The article demonstrates that tensions at the Camp continued well beyond the 1943 riot, and were not solely the province of the prisoners. Some attention is also given to New Zealand efforts at cultural accommodation and understanding.

Published
2015-06-23
How to Cite
HARMAN, Kristyn. "A definite feeling of antagonism": Rising Tensions over Clothing at the Featherston Prisoner-of-War Camp in World War Two. The Journal of New Zealand Studies, [S.l.], n. 20, june 2015. ISSN 2324-3740. Available at: <https://ojs.victoria.ac.nz/jnzs/article/view/3879>. Date accessed: 06 dec. 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.26686/jnzs.v0i20.3879.