“Recording the Incident with a Monument”: The Waikato War in Historical Memory

  • Vincent O'Malley

Abstract

This paper charts changing perceptions of the Waikato War in national memory and consciousness. The recent sesquicentenary passed by most New Zealanders largely unnoticed.   Historical memories of the war that once (in part thanks to James Cowan) fed into larger nation-building narratives cut across them today. A century ago it was possible for Pākehā to believe that the Waikato War had given birth to fifty years of peace and that mutual respect forged in battle had provided the basis for “race relations” of unparalleled harmony. By the 1970s such a notion could no longer be sustained, leaving a kind of uncomfortable silence about one of the decisive events in New Zealand history.

Published
2015-05-13
How to Cite
O'MALLEY, Vincent. “Recording the Incident with a Monument”: The Waikato War in Historical Memory. The Journal of New Zealand Studies, [S.l.], n. 19, may 2015. ISSN 2324-3740. Available at: <https://ojs.victoria.ac.nz/jnzs/article/view/3767>. Date accessed: 12 dec. 2018. doi: https://doi.org/10.26686/jnzs.v0i19.3767.