Multidisciplinary Research Collaborations, Vision Mātauranga Science, and the Potential of Anthropology in Aotearoa-New Zealand

  • Marama Muru-Lanning

Abstract




Vision Mātauranga policy has been created to commodify and globalise Māori knowledge that belongs to Māori communities, and is now the expected mechanism for all engagement between university researchers and Māori communities. However, much of the risk associated with forming new collaborations rests with Māori communities, and even more so with the Māori researchers who act as intermediaries and brokers between these communities and the research team. In this new knowledge landscape what opportunities and spaces for action does Vision Mātauranga hold for social anthropology? Furthermore, how does Vision Mātauranga force anthropology to be more inclusive of the descendants of Maori ancestors on whose backs the discipline was built?




Published
2017-12-18
How to Cite
MURU-LANNING, Marama. Multidisciplinary Research Collaborations, Vision Mātauranga Science, and the Potential of Anthropology in Aotearoa-New Zealand. Commoning Ethnography, [S.l.], v. 1, n. 1, p. 137-141, dec. 2017. ISSN 2537-9879. Available at: <https://ojs.victoria.ac.nz/ce/article/view/4133>. Date accessed: 21 june 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.26686/ce.v1i1.4133.
Section
Special Section: Debating the Commons in Aotearoa